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Davet

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  1. I don't understand how people can believe speedway was better in the past but also say you can't turn the clock back. Surely it's clear that, if you're going in the wrong direction the sensible thing to do is to turn back. Who mentioned rule changes? Technology has reduced the smell, but has also detracted from the overall experience.
  2. I take it, Orion that you don't regard yourself as an older fan, and consequently you don't realise how much better speedway was 30 or so years ago! Sure, the racing was probably no better than it is today, but the noise, the smell, the atmosphere and most of all the fun has largely been lost from the sport to its detriment. Speedway today takes itself far too seriously. If you have ever watched stock cars or bangers you would have to agree that the "racing" is nothing special. Difficult to tell who is winning, if you even care, but these events seem to attract far better crowds than speedway, simply because of the noise and the smell, etc. which speedway has systematically eradicated due to "technological improvement". I know that, unfortunately it would be difficult to reintroduce the noise and to a lesser extent the smell as this would upset the environmentalists, bit I can't help thinking that reverting to deep tracks so that rider ability was more important than horse power would be a step in the right direction. How you bring the fun back is another question altogether!
  3. That was a memorable meeting - for the wrong reasons in some respects - but I would swap the speedway served up then for the sanitised, present day offering any day of the week!
  4. I was there too and there was no possible excuse for Howe's action. If Jeremy Doncaster had reacted it would have been understandable if not excusable. It was nothing to do with Howe. Fortunately he seemed to disappear off the scene shortly after and good riddance! There's no place for such stupid behaviour in an already dangerous sport.
  5. How did Nicki come to be brought into this?
  6. Read it again! It was the deliberate nature of Howe's action that was unforgiveable. Ronni Pedersen was, to my best memory an awkward rider, and he was certainly guilty of some unacceptable moves, but I don't believe he was ever guilty of deliberate foul riding.
  7. You weren't there though were you? Ronni Pedersen's trouble was his confidence exceeded his ability, but I don't think he ever deliberately fenced or otherwise impeded another rider. Ben Howe, on the other hand deliberately used his bike as a weapon, forcing Ronni to collide with the fence. I don't understand, to this day why he didn't receive a ban. Speedway is dangerous enough without idiots like him being allowed to act in such a way.
  8. People seem to ignore the fact that electric vehicles are not "clean"; it's just that the pollution occurs somewhere else. You can argue that these are beneficial in an urban environment where local air quality may be an issue, but petrol / diesel power is more appropriate for non urban environments where journeys are generally longer as well. The same thing can be said for hydrogen power. Hydrogen itself can be said to be a clean fuel, but where will it come from? I suspect by reforming hydrocarbons, as gas companies did in the past, but this results in the production of carbon dioxide which is released to the atmosphere so, again, the pollution would simply occur somewhere else!
  9. I'm not disagreeing with you - I'm simply making the point that noise reduction, along with H and S and other factors, while perhaps inevitable, is making speedway less attractive to many.
  10. During the '60s and '70s, the noise and the smell and (I'm afraid to say) the crashes were a great part of the appeal to many people. Closeness of racing and league success was less important than it is today as, win or lose the spectacle was enjoyable. Todays sanitised product, with the loss of the smell and much reduced noise level has greatly reduced this appeal and I believe is the reason for the disenchantment of many fans and the consequent diminishing gates. I believe the introduction of silent, electric bikes would be the last nail in the coffin for the sport, if indeed it lasts that long!
  11. I think the question should be WHY, not WHEN!
  12. Davet

    Gerhard Engine

    Seems to me that: 1. The modern, highly tuned engines cannot cope with a grippy track, and tracks have become increasingly slick for that reason. 2. Grippy tracks generally lead to faster heat times than slick tracks. If we accept these observations, it seems to me that, if tracks were consistently prepared with more grip, the need for a highly tuned engine would be negated, without sacrificing speed. I think for too long track conditions have been prepared to suit the machine, whereas it should be the other way round.
  13. During the Frost years the blade came out during the interval almost every week to scrape the loose dirt from the outside to mid track, after which the whole track was graded. Didn't seem to cause much reaction then!
  14. I had thought that the present scoring system, which favours the away team, offsetting any home track advantage would have removed the need for tactical subs / rides. I agree that it is time for them to go, although it won't stop me from attending meetings.
  15. Don't think anyone would argue that being fit was anything but a good thing. It's just that the modern, professional, sanitised version of Speedway is less appealing to the average spectator than the unsilenced, smelly version of the sport which existed in the 60s and 70s. The fitness regime is just one symptom of the professionalism which has reduced the appeal of the sport in my opinion.
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