Jump to content
British Speedway Forum
The White Knight

European Union - In Or Out?

Recommended Posts

4 minutes ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

Would imagine though, that modern engines produce 2-3 more times more power for a given capacity. 

In fairness the Fiesta is a real goer when you put you foot down, and is more comfortable at a higher cruising speed but it all comes at a cost.  I drive a VW Polo which I think is a fantastic car to drive . Much better gearbox than the fiesta and a far more tractable engine, with better fuel consumption. It still looks like a plumbers nightmare when you open the bonnet though.

Share this post


Link to post
19 minutes ago, E I Addio said:

Only  £300 million?  Ursula Von Der Leyen said , on Twitter the EU invested “billions” . That woman is as useless on figures as Diane Abbott. No wonder calls for her resignation started almost as soon as she came into the job

 

The EU did spend billions. There is more than one vaccine you know?

Share this post


Link to post
18 minutes ago, MattK said:

The EU did spend billions. There is more than one vaccine you know?

and how's their vaccination programme going ? They may have spent a bit more, but their programme is in tatters, as opposed to the UK having the higher vaccination rate behind only Israel.

Edited by Tsunami

Share this post


Link to post
12 minutes ago, E I Addio said:

In fairness the Fiesta is a real goer when you put you foot down, and is more comfortable at a higher cruising speed but it all comes at a cost.  I drive a VW Polo which I think is a fantastic car to drive . Much better gearbox than the fiesta and a far more tractable engine, with better fuel consumption. It still looks like a plumbers nightmare when you open the bonnet though.

I've got a Vito van that I absolutely love driving, 160hp, brilliant auto box, comfortable. I like it so much that a couple of years ago the missus was seriously unimpressed that after she booked a weekend in the posh hotel on the cliff at Tintagel I insisted on taking the van rather than her Megane as it's a fair way to drive :D

However the other day I had to replace the alternator (it still charged but they now have a clutch on the pulley that had seized) and it took 4 1/2 hours in total because you have to take the complete front off the van to get at it. Not forgetting that I trained as a mechanic. Mercedes quote 4 hours but they've done it before! Given the price of a genuine alternator and labour that means an alternator would cost well over £1000 to replace if you put it in the garage which is crazy just because they didn't design in a gap big enough to remove it. I could easily do an alternator on a Mercedes 508 or similar in 20 minutes.

That old mini might have been less powerful and probably less reliable and refined but at the end of the day it would still reach the speed limit  and get you anywhere you wanted so as far as doing the job was just as good really.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, MattK said:

The EU invested £300m upfront in the AstraZeneca vaccine. Does that mean they get to take four times as much credit as Britain?

Only £11.5m per country, a paltry amount in comparison to the UK (not forgetting that a good chunk of that EU investment came from UK money as well!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
8 minutes ago, Vince said:

Only £11.5m per country, a paltry amount in comparison to the UK (not forgetting that a good chunk of that EU investment came from UK money as well!

The EU invested over 2 billion euros up front in a range of different vaccines. 300m euros went to Astra Zeneca, which is substantially more than the UK paid up front (£65m according to Phlipphlopp). Therefore, if the British government can claim credit for investing/funding/backing (or whatever anyone is claiming) the Astra Zeneca vaccine, then the EU deserves at least the same credit.

All major countries invested vast amounts in advance orders to expedite the development of various vaccines. Therefore, I don't think any country honestly can take credit for this. Britain gave regulatory approval sooner, allowing us to start our vaccination programme first. The EU have vaccinated people faster and have therefore vaccinated more people, but a smaller percentage of their overall population.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
11 minutes ago, MattK said:

The EU invested over 2 billion euros up front in a range of different vaccines. 300m euros went to Astra Zeneca, which is substantially more than the UK paid up front (£65m according to Phlipphlopp). Therefore, if the British government can claim credit for investing/funding/backing (or whatever anyone is claiming) the Astra Zeneca vaccine, then the EU deserves at least the same credit.

All major countries invested vast amounts in advance orders to expedite the development of various vaccines. Therefore, I don't think any country honestly can take credit for this. Britain gave regulatory approval sooner, allowing us to start our vaccination programme first. The EU have vaccinated people faster and have therefore vaccinated more people, but a smaller percentage of their overall population.

So a smaller investment per country and a lower percentage vaccinated.

Share this post


Link to post
41 minutes ago, Vince said:

I've got a Vito van that I absolutely love driving, 160hp, brilliant auto box, comfortable. I like it so much that a couple of years ago the missus was seriously unimpressed that after she booked a weekend in the posh hotel on the cliff at Tintagel I insisted on taking the van rather than her Megane as it's a fair way to drive :D

However the other day I had to replace the alternator (it still charged but they now have a clutch on the pulley that had seized) and it took 4 1/2 hours in total because you have to take the complete front off the van to get at it. Not forgetting that I trained as a mechanic. Mercedes quote 4 hours but they've done it before! Given the price of a genuine alternator and labour that means an alternator would cost well over £1000 to replace if you put it in the garage which is crazy just because they didn't design in a gap big enough to remove it. I could easily do an alternator on a Mercedes 508 or similar in 20 minutes.

That old mini might have been less powerful and probably less reliable and refined but at the end of the day it would still reach the speed limit  and get you anywhere you wanted so as far as doing the job was just as good really.

Yes the trouble with modern vehicles is that for all the technological advances , they cost a lot of money to repair when things go wrong, and in some cases routine servicing.

A neighbour who is an ex motor cycle mechanic told me that is you change the spark plug on a modern BMW motorcycle and do the job as per the manufacturers instructions it can take 5hours. Of course, the professionals find short cuts, but these jobs are impractical for most owners to do themselves, but it’s still a long way from the Triumphs, Norton’s and even Yamahas when it was a less than five minute  job to change the plug.

As for reliability of the Mini, I never broke down on either of mine. In fact I am convinced 99%of breakdowns are caused by lack of maintenance rather than a fault with the vehicle.

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, MattK said:

The EU invested over 2 billion euros up front in a range of different vaccines. 300m euros went to Astra Zeneca, which is substantially more than the UK paid up front (£65m according to Phlipphlopp). Therefore, if the British government can claim credit for investing/funding/backing (or whatever anyone is claiming) the Astra Zeneca vaccine, then the EU deserves at least the same credit.

All major countries invested vast amounts in advance orders to expedite the development of various vaccines. Therefore, I don't think any country honestly can take credit for this. Britain gave regulatory approval sooner, allowing us to start our vaccination programme first. The EU have vaccinated people faster and have therefore vaccinated more people, but a smaller percentage of their overall population.

Maybe they have invested so much as the EU was so’s slow from the start even behind the USA. More interested in driving down the price on the vaccines they were buying.

Share this post


Link to post
37 minutes ago, Tim G said:

Maybe they have invested so much as the EU was so’s slow from the start even behind the USA. More interested in driving down the price on the vaccines they were buying.

 

2 hours ago, MattK said:

The EU invested over 2 billion euros up front in a range of different vaccines. 300m euros went to Astra Zeneca, which is substantially more than the UK paid up front (£65m according to Phlipphlopp). Therefore, if the British government can claim credit for investing/funding/backing (or whatever anyone is claiming) the Astra Zeneca vaccine, then the EU deserves at least the same credit.

All major countries invested vast amounts in advance orders to expedite the development of various vaccines. Therefore, I don't think any country honestly can take credit for this. Britain gave regulatory approval sooner, allowing us to start our vaccination programme first. The EU have vaccinated people faster and have therefore vaccinated more people, but a smaller percentage of their overall population.

DON'T think the British government has actually claimed credit for the development and success of the AstraZeneca vaccine, although their financial support was vital, but more for their foresight in purchasing millions of doses even before it had been authorised for use which is what put the UK ahead of the game. 

Share this post


Link to post

Jenner Institute out of pocket with expected loss of its largest funder, the European Commission

The head of a UK institute behind a promising coronavirus vaccine candidate is concerned about how to replace European Union funding after Brexit.

Adrian Hill, who is director of the Jenner Institute at the University of Oxford (pictured), made the comments following news that their vaccine—known as ChAdOx1 nCoV-19—had produced a promising immune response in a large, early-stage human trial.

The potential vaccine is being developed in collaboration with pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, with the first deliveries potentially starting in September. The UK has already ordered 100 million doses of the vaccine.

Responding to a question from Research Professional News on the impact of Brexit on vaccine development during a Science Media Centre briefing on 20 July, Hill said that while the Covid-19 vaccine did not rely on EU funding, the institute does rely heavily on funding from the European Commission.

https://www.researchprofessionalnews.com/rr-news-uk-universities-2020-7-brexit-funding-gap-for-oxford-s-covid-19-vaccine-institute/

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Privacy Policy