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In My View By Phil Rising

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Peter Oakes is always worth listening to, one of those people who knows the sport inside and out and has the ability to explain what he sees. Such a shame the authorities didn't back his U15 work more a decade and more ago.

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Peter Oakes is always worth listening to, one of those people who knows the sport inside and out and has the ability to explain what he sees.

Unfortunately both articles are somewhat stating the 'bleeding obvious' and I think many on here could also articulate similar problem statements. A lot of wishful thinking such as we get bigger sponsors, yet ignoring the fact that the sport hasn't really managed that in the past 20 years. Just not the reading ideas for the way forward, what's being done about it, and who should be involved.

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Yes we know the vast problems our speedway has, but the 2 articles were for fans in Poland so they would know what problems we have

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Yes we know the vast problems our speedway has, but the 2 articles were for fans in Poland so they would know what problems we have

Just a question (not knowing the merits of the Polish speedway domestic league) but has its fan base been maintained or is interest waining? I don't have access to speedway on whatever channel now broadcasts the sport.

 

I recall that whilst Tony Rickardsson was winning championships that the Swedish League took an upsurge in interest.

Edited by steve roberts

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In the same article poblished in pokredzie.pl Josh Gudgeon who is Monster's speedway expert, as well as Greg Hancock's team member said this:

 

In Poland at every step there is a talk about the sport and financial gap between the two leagues (EkstraLiga and Nice LigaZuzlowa. In the UK it looks quite different. And paradoxically - this is not good at all.

 

"I think the combination of several factors, such as BSPA's policy, low wages, weak leagues, and a small number of top riders, has led to a drop in levels. There is not much difference between the two leagues. Sometimes in the Premiership meeting there is one, at the most two riders who do not ride in the Championship League, . So it's easy to see a closed circle there are not many fans on terraces, because the product is weak, and it is weak, because it lacks money. In order to develop, you have to spend and the British clubs focus primarily on cost cutting and lowering the level of competition, and in return expect fans to pay the same amount. Why would they pay the same for a worse product?" Josh Gudgeon asked rhetorically.

 

"One of the major problems is that, unlike Sweden and Poland, our leagues ride always on different days of the week, which discourages top riders. In these two countries (Poland and Sweden) the riders know they have 18 matches on the same day and in England there are over 40 league meetings, all on different days . Why Tai Woffinden, or Greg Hancock, for example, would have wanted to ride so often, always on different day and for a smaller amount of money? The leading league must be for leading riders and have one day (Monday) when meetings are held. The meetings must also be attractive to them, so they should not race with youngsters who also ride in the National League - it's as if Cristiano Ronaldo had to play against a junior team of under sixteen.

 

On the subject of men in suits (the BSPA), Josh Gudgeon added his three pennies.

 

The BSPA was talked loudly about this season due to the large number of penalties and suspensions it has imposed (Chris Holder salutes). In Poland, the president of Ekstraliga, Wojciech Stępniewski, is also often criticised for managing a club in the past. In UK there is no room for guesses and potential connections , because these ... are obvious. Among other BSPA members there is , Keith Chapman (King's Lynn), Rob Godfrey (Scunthorpe), George English (Newcastle), Damien Bates (Leicester and Sheffield) and Colin Pratt (Swindon) . - Why BSPA works in a bad way ?, because there are people in it who are focused only on their clubs. It's not their fault, because they have to take care of their own interests. But there are too many people who do not think ahead. Every year, it's just about saving and spending less and less, how this suppose to help you grow? Our goal is only to survive the year, there are no long-term strategies. For example, what are the plans once this season is over? How do we want to convince Woffinden, Dudek, or Janowski, to ride in the UK? No one is thinking about it, our people in power are only happy to survive the next month or a year, not thinking about prospects and future. There should be independent people in BSPA who are not affiliated to any club. We need young, forward-thinking activists who are familiar with marketing, social media and promotion our sport must follow current trends. Nowadays, it's not enough to hang a poster, you need a strategy, " said Josh Gudgeon.

 

And what about the world speedway? What perspectives do we face for our sport ? Is there any possibility of expansion beyond Europe? -

 

Yes, I think there is a chance to win big sponsors. There are already a few, but it would be great if their support was a bit bigger. For example, Red Bull - generally supports many great competitors, but in the case of speedway it does not go in expansion outside Poland. If more Grand Prix rounds would be outside Europe, more global brands would be interested in sponsoring. If we had a GP round in the United States sponsored by Monster, then Red Bull would probably want to get involved. At this time the Grand Prix takes place practically only in Europe, so it is only for the European Companies to make sense of the GP series. If I was a representative GoPro, for example, why would I sponsor speedway that is only active in Europe, since I can advertise in sports that have a global reach? Imagine the Grand Prix being held in the United States, South Africa, Dubai, etc. - then there would indeed be competitions of a great scope, and the sponsors would have noticed it. Maybe we will never reach Formula 1 or MotoGP level, but why not the MXGP . To do that however, more rounds are needed outside of Europe, not just one, "added Gudgeon.

Is Josh Gudgeon not the grandson of Peter Oakes? Edited by JoeW

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Is Josh Gudgeon not the grandson of Peter Oakes?

Yes he is, probably hence the similarity in the contents.

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Just a question (not knowing the merits of the Polish speedway domestic league) but has its fan base been maintained or is interest waining?

 

In 2017 season Polish EkstraLiga attracted on terraces 633 086 fans in 65 meeting. On average, one meeting was attended by 9 739 fans.

 

 

When it comes to every speedway league meeting that has taken place in 2017 in Poland then the figure is over one million spectators, or 1 050 530 to be precise, (in 180 meetings) .That makes on average 5 836 spectators at every single League meeting in Polish speedway.

source: sportowefakty.pl

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In 2017 season Polish EkstraLiga attracted on terraces 633 086 fans in 65 meeting. On average, one meeting was attended by 9 739 fans.

 

 

 

When it comes to every speedway league meeting that has taken place in 2017 in Poland then the figure is over one million spectators, or 1 050 530 to be precise, (in 180 meetings) .That makes on average 5 836 spectators at every single League meeting in Polish speedway.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: sportowefakty.pl

Many thanks for that!

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In 2017 season Polish EkstraLiga attracted on terraces 633 086 fans in 65 meeting. On average, one meeting was attended by 9 739 fans.

 

 

When it comes to every speedway league meeting that has taken place in 2017 in Poland then the figure is over one million spectators, or 1 050 530 to be precise, (in 180 meetings) .That makes on average 5 836 spectators at every single League meeting in Polish speedway.

 

It would be very interesting to know the figures for British speedway. I guess the average at Ipswich would be around 1300

 

 

 

 

 

source: sportowefakty.pl

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In 2017 season Polish EkstraLiga attracted on terraces 633 086 fans in 65 meeting. On average, one meeting was attended by 9 739 fans.

 

 

 

Extraliga attendances:

 

1992 13847

2010 8536

2015 8717

2016 8379

 

I'd guess that most of this year's increase is down to Wroclaw returning home, so crowds have been fairly steady for the last decade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by arnieg

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In 2017 season Polish EkstraLiga attracted on terraces 633 086 fans in 65 meeting. On average, one meeting was attended by 9 739 fans.

 

 

 

When it comes to every speedway league meeting that has taken place in 2017 in Poland then the figure is over one million spectators, or 1 050 530 to be precise, (in 180 meetings) .That makes on average 5 836 spectators at every single League meeting in Polish speedway.

 

It would be very interesting to know the figures for British speedway. I guess the average at Ipswich would be around 1300

 

 

 

 

 

source: sportowefakty.pl

 

550/650 my guess on average accross the 3 leagues

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Except that it didn't answer your question.

...forgot what my question was now!

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