Jump to content
British Speedway Forum
Sign in to follow this  
gustix

Crystal Palace Museum

Recommended Posts

This book by the late Lionel Crossley - a former pioneer Palace rider - is a brilliant history of Crystal Palace speedway happenings.

http://www.crystalpalacefoundation.org.uk/shop/motor-sport/crystal-palace-speedway

 

 

 

​Some recollections of the late Lionel Crossley, author the classic history of Crystal Palace speedway book.

http://www.national-speedway-museum.co.uk/lionel-crossley-profile.html

http://www.crystalpa...palace-speedway

Edited by gustix

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

​Sme recollections of the late Lionel Crossley, author the classic history of Crystal Palace speedway book.

http://www.national-speedway-museum.co.uk/lionel-crossley-profile.html

 

 

 

A profile of Lionel Crossley as on the National Speedway Museum website:

http://www.national-speedway-museum.co.uk/lionel-crossley-profile.html

The old marbles playing up again.I know it was a couple of days in between,but that is just posting the same link........ :o:rofl:

 

As i have said before,i do wonder if you even read the stuff you post :icon_smile_clown:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1940 - the end for Crystal Palace Speedway:

:::::::::

TWO war time speedway meetings took place at Crystal Palace in 1940, the last time racing took place there.

On Easter Sunday, March 25, Arthur Atkinson (West Ham) won the Holiday Cup, heading Colin Watson (West Ham) and Keith Harvey (Norwich) in a top scorers final. The known points scorers (each had three qualifying rides) were: Harvey 9, Phil Bishop (West Ham) 7, Watson 7, Atkinson 6, Wally Lloyd (Harringay) 6. Other starters were Harold 'Tiger' Stevenson (West Ham) and Arch Windmill (Hackney). In heat two, Harvey set the meeting's fastest time and a new track record of 79.8 seconds.

In the programme notes, spectators were advised: "In the event of an air raid warning, all visitors living within five minutes walk are advised to go home." They were also told that air raid shelters were provided "under the centre steps."

On May 13, another Holiday Cup meeting was held. This was over 12 heats with two semi-finals and a final. The qualifying scorers were: Phil 'Tiger' Hart (Hackney) 9, Archie Windmill (Hackney) 8, Bill Longley (New Cross) 7, Ron Johnson (New Cross) 6, Mick Mitchell (Crystal Palace) 5, Charlie Page (Hackney) 5, Fred 'Friar' Tuck 5, Ken Brett (West Ham) 4, George Craig (Bristol) 4, Ron Howes (West Ham) 3, Bob Hall 2, George Gower (Crystal Palace) 2, Vic Weir (Norwich) 2, Les Trim (Crystal Palace) 1, Alex Gray (Wimbledon) 1, Keith Harvey (Crystal Palace) 0. FINAL: Hart, Windmill, Tuck, Johnson (no finish).

Programme changes were Langley (not Longley) for Charlie Appleby (Crystal Palace), Page replaced Wally Lloyd (Harringay), Gower replaced Jeff Lloyd (Newcastle).

The 'South London Press' (May 15 1940) reported that New Cross and Australia star Ron Johnson was leading the final by five yards when he ground to a halt with a puncture. This let Phil 'Tiger' Hart clear to win by two lengths from Arch Windmill. An early posting lists Fred 'Friar' Tuck as the other finalist - it would be interesting to know if he finished the race".

There remains one major query on the qualifying scorers which were not given in the South London Press. I t concerns Bill Longley who on a scribbled list of scorers is actually given as LANGLEY. Indications are that it could not have been Longley as West Ham were staging a meeting at the same time and Longley was racing there. One possibility is that as Phil Hart was at Crystal Palace, it have been his pal the Australian rider Steve Langton? Who knows? More importantly - will we ever know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This could well have been the train that took fans to those two meetings and many others

 

crystal_palace_high_level(brian_halford_

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Privacy Policy