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1 hour ago, Sidney the robin said:

Great post thanks a lot.    what was your favourite track ? the Shay you and Booey were pretty hard to beat 67/71 only see you ride twice but my uncle told me you were pretty good what can you remember of the Owlerton championship round ??? when you were not happy.!!

...hang on Sid! We're not talking Dave Younghusband here are we?

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59 minutes ago, steve roberts said:

...hang on Sid! We're not talking Dave Younghusband here are we?

Only guessing not sure!!!            good rider and a mega association with Newcastle which is still going strong they had some great sides Joe/Tom Rod Hunter,Ron Henderson, Blackadder, and  later Carter they were a real force in a very good NL.As for Dave only see ride twice for Halifax and once for Cradley my uncle who first took me said he was good he kept harping on about Forrest, Booey ,,Younghusband and he was a fan of Les Sharpe who he felt was very inconsistent.

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2 hours ago, Sidney the robin said:

Why ??. if not who is it ? be great to unravel this mystery.!

 

2 hours ago, Sidney the robin said:

Why ??. if not who is it ? be great to unravel this mystery.!

Dave Rowland IMO .

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5 minutes ago, Fromafar said:

that's Kevin! Is it not.

I just didnt want Sid to be the only one looking all mixed up :D

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17 hours ago, Fromafar said:

that's Kevin! Is it not.

Don't mention Eileen. Come on.:P

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IVAN did it his way ...

It was only two years since Ivan Mauger had equalled Ove Fundin’s record of five World Championship victories in Gothenburg in 1977 but there were many who felt that the Kiwi would struggle to go one better and fulfil his dream of standing alone in the history books.
Despite seeing his great rival Ole Olsen claim the title at a Wembley in 1978, Ivan’s faith his own ability to claim the record he always craved remained undiminished.
Ivan might already have had six but for an untimely crash at the Slaski Stadium in Katowice in 1973 and it was here in 1979 that he devised a plan that would turn upside down how he had approached all his previous World Final appearances.
Ivan would always establish his camp well away from the centre of attention, out of the public eye, untroubled by the media mob. Of course, there were no mobile phones in those days but even if there had been his would have been turned off.
Nothing would be allowed to interrupt his preparation, surrounded only by those closest to him, including mechanics Gordon Stubbs and Norrie Allen, manager Peter Oakes and his immediate family. 
All that went out of the window. Ivan joined the Press corps (39 strong with all the British national newspapers represented along with journos from provincial papers the length and breadth of the country) encamped at the Novotel hotel in Katowice along with the likes of his Hull promoters Ian Thomas and Brian Larner, fellow Kiwi Barry Briggs and American speedway supremo Harry Oxley.
After practice, Ivan returned to the hotel, ate with us and then adjourned to the bar (no alcohol of course) chatting away and ignoring protestations from both Briggo and Oxley that he should retire to bed and get some sleep in preparation for what lay ahead the next day.
It was all so out of character and prompted many to conclude that even Ivan didn’t rate his chances and was simply in Poland to enjoy himself.
This theory, however ridiculous, did however gain still more credence the following morning when Ivan asked if he could hitch a lift to the stadium later in the day on the Press coach.

It was so unlike him, but he was relaxed, chatty, at ease with himself and everyone around him.
As the coach made its way to a parking area we had pre-arranged a couple of hours before the start, Ivan jumped off and walked into the giant stadium like any other spectator, unrecognized by anyone. He simply disappeared into the crowd.
Those of us who knew him best had already began to speculate that this all part of a carefully constructed plan, to take all the pressure off himself and convince his opponents that despite his history he wasn’t a realistic threat.
It was, as we all found out, a brilliant tactical ruse. Ivan, a few weeks short of his 40th birthday, raced to a superlative sixth title success, defying those who suspected he was past his best.

We celebrated appropriately with him at the hotel before flying back to England the following morning. 

Ivan wasn’t the only one who walked away happy and enriched by his evening’s work.

The bookmakers had slashed the odds on a Mauger victory and the ever-astute Thomastook full advantage and placed a bundle on his Viking winning. 

Ivan never rode in another World Final. He had smashed his winning six and, as ever, done it his way.

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2 hours ago, PHILIPRISING said:

IVAN did it his way ...

It was only two years since Ivan Mauger had equalled Ove Fundin’s record of five World Championship victories in Gothenburg in 1977 but there were many who felt that the Kiwi would struggle to go one better and fulfil his dream of standing alone in the history books.
Despite seeing his great rival Ole Olsen claim the title at a Wembley in 1978, Ivan’s faith his own ability to claim the record he always craved remained undiminished.
Ivan might already have had six but for an untimely crash at the Slaski Stadium in Katowice in 1973 and it was here in 1979 that he devised a plan that would turn upside down how he had approached all his previous World Final appearances.
Ivan would always establish his camp well away from the centre of attention, out of the public eye, untroubled by the media mob. Of course, there were no mobile phones in those days but even if there had been his would have been turned off.
Nothing would be allowed to interrupt his preparation, surrounded only by those closest to him, including mechanics Gordon Stubbs and Norrie Allen, manager Peter Oakes and his immediate family. 
All that went out of the window. Ivan joined the Press corps (39 strong with all the British national newspapers represented along with journos from provincial papers the length and breadth of the country) encamped at the Novotel hotel in Katowice along with the likes of his Hull promoters Ian Thomas and Brian Larner, fellow Kiwi Barry Briggs and American speedway supremo Harry Oxley.
After practice, Ivan returned to the hotel, ate with us and then adjourned to the bar (no alcohol of course) chatting away and ignoring protestations from both Briggo and Oxley that he should retire to bed and get some sleep in preparation for what lay ahead the next day.
It was all so out of character and prompted many to conclude that even Ivan didn’t rate his chances and was simply in Poland to enjoy himself.
This theory, however ridiculous, did however gain still more credence the following morning when Ivan asked if he could hitch a lift to the stadium later in the day on the Press coach.

It was so unlike him, but he was relaxed, chatty, at ease with himself and everyone around him.
As the coach made its way to a parking area we had pre-arranged a couple of hours before the start, Ivan jumped off and walked into the giant stadium like any other spectator, unrecognized by anyone. He simply disappeared into the crowd.
Those of us who knew him best had already began to speculate that this all part of a carefully constructed plan, to take all the pressure off himself and convince his opponents that despite his history he wasn’t a realistic threat.
It was, as we all found out, a brilliant tactical ruse. Ivan, a few weeks short of his 40th birthday, raced to a superlative sixth title success, defying those who suspected he was past his best.

We celebrated appropriately with him at the hotel before flying back to England the following morning. 

Ivan wasn’t the only one who walked away happy and enriched by his evening’s work.

The bookmakers had slashed the odds on a Mauger victory and the ever-astute Thomastook full advantage and placed a bundle on his Viking winning. 

Ivan never rode in another World Final. He had smashed his winning six and, as ever, done it his way.

...an interesting insight regarding Ivan's change of approach to the 1979 World Final.

The more I think of Ivan's passing the more apparent that a great part of the sport that I once knew no longer exists.

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