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BOBBATH

Riders who should have made the World Final but never did!

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Let me start this off: Tommy Miller, Charlie Monk (for sure), Roy Trigg, Norman Hunter, George Hunter would reckon these guys would have graced the World Final more than some of 'em did. What say other forumlanders?

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Before I forget what about Jim Squibb?

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As like a similar thread the unfortunate Arne Pander would have graced any World Final if injuries hadn't slowed him down.

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1 hour ago, steve roberts said:

As like a similar thread the unfortunate Arne Pander would have graced any World Final if injuries hadn't slowed him down.

Arne Pander is a prime candidate for this one!

It should also be pointed out that it wasn't just the injuries, but also his decision to prioritise riding in Britain, which didn't go down well with the Danish authorities. Arne took out British citizenship and entered the British qualifying rounds in 1966, having missed out in a few key seasons in the meantime.

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Bobby Schwartz is the obvious name surely?

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2 hours ago, falcace said:

Bobby Schwartz is the obvious name surely?

We have actually covered this subject on the BSF before, and for me, Schwartz is the one who stands out.

Steve

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Tom Farndon....or doesn't it count if they died before the World Championship was introduced?

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Posted (edited)

Max Grosskreutz... favourite to win in 1936, but got injured and missed the qualifiers.  He lent his bike to fellow Aussie Bluey Wilkinson, who raced to a 15-point-maximum at Wembley on his steed.

Grosskreutz subsequently retired and became manager of Norwich.  He raced the odd meeting for them, and made a brief comeback post-war.

Edited by lucifer sam
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1 hour ago, norbold said:

Tom Farndon....or doesn't it count if they died before the World Championship was introduced?

Farndon's death was only the year before, so I'd say it counts.

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2 hours ago, norbold said:

Tom Farndon....or doesn't it count if they died before the World Championship was introduced?

You never disappoint! Just surprised it took you that long to comment...

Seriously though, as was already mentioned, with the World Final only a year away, only a fool (of course, we have a few on here) would ever think that Tom wouldn't have been a multi-world finalist. Of course, it's hard to say if he would have still been around post-war, but I think he was young enough to have had a long and successful career.

Steve

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3 hours ago, chunky said:

You never disappoint! Just surprised it took you that long to comment...

Seriously though, as was already mentioned, with the World Final only a year away, only a fool (of course, we have a few on here) would ever think that Tom wouldn't have been a multi-world finalist. Of course, it's hard to say if he would have still been around post-war, but I think he was young enough to have had a long and successful career.

Steve

I think there is no doubt he would have qualified in the three (four including 1939) pre-War years injuries permitting. He would have been 36 in 1946, the same age as Vic Duggan and five years younger than Jack Parker.

Good call about Max Grosskreutz, LS.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, norbold said:

I think there is no doubt he would have qualified in the three (four including 1939) pre-War years injuries permitting. He would have been 36 in 1946, the same age as Vic Duggan and five years younger than Jack Parker.

Even at the time of the 1949 final, several of the finalists on show were in their late 30's, and both Parkers, Lamoreaux, and Kitchen were in their 40's. 

Steve

Edited by chunky

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Garry Middleton gets my vote. Boy was he controversial, but he was also a fine rider for Hackney and Oxford at his peak. Also finished 3rd in the Internationale at Wimbledon when the lineup was arguably stronger than the World Final.

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12 hours ago, prodons said:

Garry Middleton gets my vote. Boy was he controversial, but he was also a fine rider for Hackney and Oxford at his peak. Also finished 3rd in the Internationale at Wimbledon when the lineup was arguably stronger than the World Final.

He certainly livened up Oxford when he rode as a 'Rebel' in 1972!

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Martin Piddock and Peter Bradshaw . Two massive talents taken from us in the Lokkoren disaster.

How Bob Kilby never made a World Final I shall never know.

Not sure if John Boulger made one but he should have done.

Ivor Brown was a hard man who was possibly on the cusp of big things before he was seriously injured. 

By and large though, I think under the old style single WF most who should have made it got there at least once as opposed the the GP system where for some it depends on whether your face fits.

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