Jump to content
British Speedway Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Seymour Dix

Scam Warning

Recommended Posts

Someone phoned my partners  89 year old Aunt yesterday claiming to be from the DWP, claiming that a system error had wiped her bank details and that her payments would be stopped until she gave them. I rang the DWP to check who said no such situation existed. Just be warned if you have  elderly relations. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

They usually target older people as they are more vulnerable and trusting that people are telling the truth. :(

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
19 hours ago, Gemini said:

They usually target older people as they are more vulnerable and trusting that people are telling the truth. :(

Not us, though Gemini!

  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
19 hours ago, Gemini said:

They usually target older people as they are more vulnerable and trusting that people are telling the truth. :(

Have had a couple and really enjoyed pretending to go along with them for as long as possible before telling them where to go. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

That's the thing I miss since having all calls go to my answering machine and someone has to speak before I pick the phone up.  I went along with some foreign gentleman last year and got as far as giving him the numbers on my card, although obviously not the real ones, before telling him to 'P*** off'. :D  At the moment I keep getting a recorded message saying my bank account has been compromised and someone is withdrawing £6,000, so I am very tempted to press 1 but have resisted so far. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Had a recent email claiming that a parcel had been held back at the depot due to unpaid delivery.

It was a scam (probably Phishing) and wanted me to click on a supposed tracking link.

My wife has had a similar text message.

Neither of us had been expecting a parcel delivery, but in these times when so many are shopping on-line I suppose many may fall for it! :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
9 minutes ago, Gambo said:

Had a recent email claiming that a parcel had been held back at the depot due to unpaid delivery.

It was a scam (probably Phishing) and wanted me to click on a supposed tracking link.

My wife has had a similar text message.

Neither of us had been expecting a parcel delivery, but in these times when so many are shopping on-line I suppose many may fall for it! :angry:

Thanks for the warning . These scams are on the increase and getting more sophisticated . We’ve had a couple claiming to be from Amazon but we don’t have an Amazon account so just put the phone but on the law of averages they will find a few that do and it’s easy to be caught unawares.

Share this post


Link to post

Fun with phone callers.

 

(1) National Insurance number:
Caller says: "Your National Insurance number has been compromised on the North Wales border, press 1 now to speak to the investigating officer in order to prevent legal action being taken against your National Insurance number.
Recommended response "I am an illegal immigrant, I smuggle things, although my main occupation is money laundering.  I do not have a National Insurance Number, so why have you called me.  I know a good dry cleaner's if you would like some money laundered."

(2) Mail delivery:
Telephone caller advises that a package cannot be delivered as insufficient postage was paid.  Card details are required, including name on the card, card number and the 3 digit number on the back. Result - one empty bank account coming up. 
The recommended response:  "Oh dear, that will be the bomb I ordered.  I have since been told it is faulty and could explode at any time.  You can keep it."  The caller will hang up at this point.

(3) Illegal internet activity:
Caller advises that they are from Microsoft and that illegal internet activity has been detected on your computer, so you need to take immediate action.  By giving the caller payment details they can remotely access your computer for a small fee (then steal the rest of your bank balance later) and rectify the problem. 
The recommended response: "Hello caller, you are through to the Metropolitan Police Cyber Crime Department in London.  Please stay on the line while we trace your location.  We have narrowed it down to India...... Mumbai..... a large building containing a lot of people with computers and mobile telephones...."  The caller will hang up at this point.

(4) Insurance claims:
Caller believes that you have recently been involved in an accident that was not your fault and informs you that you are entitled to make a claim.  This a very old one now and has become boring.  It is recommended that you intervene with the response: "Yes, indeed I have.  I was severely injured.  I have lost my sight and my hearing as a result.  Now I am also unable to speak.  Additionally, I lost both legs and both arms.  My brain was damaged.  In fact, I died." 
If the caller persists in attempting to take details of the accident, notwithstanding the foregoing, then inform them as follows: "I was driving along a motorway when a goods train crashed off a bridge, with the locomotive landing on top of me.  Leaking radioactive waste from the trucks engulfed me."  This should be sufficient to make the caller hang up.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, Gambo said:

Had a recent email claiming that a parcel had been held back at the depot due to unpaid delivery.

It was a scam (probably Phishing) and wanted me to click on a supposed tracking link.

My wife has had a similar text message.

Neither of us had been expecting a parcel delivery, but in these times when so many are shopping on-line I suppose many may fall for it! :angry:

I’ve had two of those recently “supposedly” from the Royal Mail.....both were deleted without even being opened as, like yourself, I never had anything on order.

Share this post


Link to post

Seems like a good place to ask this question,,,

Why do folk want to rip others off?

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, ruffdiamond said:

Seems like a good place to ask this question,,,

Why do folk want to rip others off?

Money?

Share this post


Link to post
3 hours ago, ruffdiamond said:

Seems like a good place to ask this question,,,

Why do folk want to rip others off?

Because they are criminal scum- i have had the Amazon prime scam phone call(automated)this week.

Edited by racers and royals

Share this post


Link to post
8 hours ago, racers and royals said:

Because they are criminal scum- i have had the Amazon prime scam phone call(automated)this week.

I've had the same successive mornings at 8-45am on the dot!

I have nothing but contempt for these people especially moreso during these times when a phone call so early in the morning would normally suggest something urgent. :angry:

Edited by steve roberts

Share this post


Link to post

I have noticed the past year more emails from parcel firms about a delivery. If you look at the email address or hover over the link if you are not sure you can usually tell it is a dodgy link. I just delete them. Also get ones that are from the tax man or tv license people to say owe them money which I just delete as if I did they would soon be round the door!

Some right scum out there using emails or telephone as they know that older and vulnerable people are at home more and are trying to get them. :angry:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Just received the royal mail scam text this morning.  Pay £2.99 shipping fee. Actions will be taken if you do not pay this fee  :D

Not only are these people fraudsters but they must be dim as well. 

The url to look out for is

https://royal-mail.delivery       which in reality is nothing like the royal mail url 

Sad world we live in

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Privacy Policy