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Covid-19 Are we being told the truth ?

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, DC2 said:

I’m quite sure that our current or recent employees of Nissan, Toyota, Honda and Ford coupled with our Formula One engineers and commercial and university scientists could provide the expertise upon which to build a car manufacturing company.

I think that ship has sailed. I don't doubt that if you threw enough money at it, you could re-create a car manufacturing company but who would fund it and what's the point? You'd be entering a highly competitive market where margins are small, and it would take years to recoup any investment if at all.

Speaking of ships though. the UK would be better off trying to revive ship manufacturing as they're more important to self-sufficiency. However, you probably didn't notice that the Scottish Government recently tried to do precisely that by nationalising Fergusons to stop it going out of business and has blown millions on ferries that are now 4 years late and counting. They've now given up and gone to Turkey for the next orders, so the notion that we can do anything if we try, does not always add up. 

Edited by Humphrey Appleby

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2 hours ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

I think that ship has sailed. I don't doubt that if you threw enough money at it, you could re-create a car manufacturing company but who would fund it and what's the point? You'd be entering a highly competitive market where margins are small, and it would take years to recoup any investment if at all.

Speaking of ships though. the UK would be better off trying to revive ship manufacturing as they're more important to self-sufficiency. However, you probably didn't notice that the Scottish Government recently tried to do precisely that by nationalising Fergusons to stop it going out of business and has blown millions on ferries that are now 4 years late and counting. They've now given up and gone to Turkey for the next orders, so the notion that we can do anything if we try, does not always add up. 

I suspect a state of the art UK car company would be very competitive in the UK compared to imported cars.

And just picking the one example of the Scottish government incident doesn’t make a rule!

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Here's a list of countries that have scrapped every last entry requirement.

Ireland Denmark Norway Iceland Poland Montenegro Hungary Lithuania Slovenia Romania Sweden Latvia Moldova Slovakia Estonia Mexico Cuba Maldives Costa Rica...

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The German attempt at getting a vaccine mandate looks like it has failed

First from 18 years was knocked back, Then from 50. Today the last hope of the government was a mandate for over 60 year olds, which was also knocked back

What a conspiracy.......back benchers have more power than the most powerful group on this planet

As predicted :rolleyes:

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The jabs are dangerous chocolate teapots...

 

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A study from Sweden published by The BMJ today finds an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (a blood clot in the leg) up to three months after covid-19 infection, pulmonary embolism (a blood clot in the lung) up to six months, and a bleeding event up to two months.

The findings also show a higher risk of events in patients with underlying conditions (comorbidities), patients with more severe covid-19, and during the first pandemic wave compared with the second and third waves.

The researchers say these results support measures to prevent thrombotic events (thromboprophylaxis), especially for high risk patients, and strengthen the importance of vaccination against covid-19. 

https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/948765

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This...

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All UK Covid 19 deaths reported today 317

1st dose vaccinations 52.8 M

2nd dose vaccinations 49.5 M

Booster or 3rd dose 38.9 M

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56 minutes ago, Blupanther said:

The jabs are dangerous chocolate teapots...

 

 

I don’t know if that’s the truth but I would like to see it as the lead story on BBC News today with a rational rebuttal from the UKHSA if appropriate.

Only the mainstream narrative ever gets heard in headline news!

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The German parliament has REJECTED a compulsory vaccination bill by a vote of 378 to 296. The Covid vaccine mandate is DEAD in Germany...

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2 hours ago, iris123 said:

The German attempt at getting a vaccine mandate looks like it has failed

First from 18 years was knocked back, Then from 50. Today the last hope of the government was a mandate for over 60 year olds, which was also knocked back

What a conspiracy.......back benchers have more power than the most powerful group on this planet

As predicted :rolleyes:

 

12 minutes ago, Blupanther said:

The German parliament has REJECTED a compulsory vaccination bill by a vote of 378 to 296. The Covid vaccine mandate is DEAD in Germany...

Your group is a bit late with the news :rofl:

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16 hours ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

Those trucks will be delivering the materials to build lots of solar panels, not just mine. 

Well according to this calculator (https://www.carbonfootprint.com/calculator.aspx), a flight from London to Perth produces just over 2 tonnes of CO2 per passenger. It's probably even less as Australia flights use the most fuel efficient aircraft and are usually carrying 300-400 passengers, as well as having fewer take-off and landing cycles. 

That's the equivalent of driving about 7,500 miles in a car, which most people will easily be doing every year. Even in a normal year my carbon footprint is still less than that of Dashcam driving around the same county in his brown van, far less him tearing up the countryside in his 4x4 chasing feathered and furry creatures around. 

But as I'm sure you're well aware, my job is putting in place the infrastructure that makes the Internet work which allows millions of people to do business remotely, which is further reducing unnecessary travel. And now that most countries have achieved a usable level of connectivity (helped by COVID), it's practical to do a lot more remotely anyway.

Complaining about people undertaking necessary travel for work is as daft as me pointing out the huge carbon footprint that's undoubtedly generated by your trucking company. It's quite obvious that goods are always going to need be delivered, but that doesn't mean that people need to be doing pointless commutes every day to go and do work in an office they could easily do from home. It's only out-of-touch reactionaries like Littlejohn that seem to think everyone should be forced to do that these days.

On the fuel prices, there's an inherent cost to buying oil which is whatever it is at any given moment in time. I don't see why commercial vehicles should expect to be subsidised on the cost of the product, especially as they invariably pass on the costs to their customers anyway. You might have a point about fuel duty, but you need to take that up with the government. 

That only applies if you never do any of the other stuff that everybody else does with vehicles. In one return flight you have already generated the same as the average car user in a year, then if you use a car for even half the usual mileage you are a higher contributor.

Indeed part of dashcams carbon footprint from his van has to be attributed to you as a customer of delivery services. The same applies to trucks where a portion of the carbon footprint is attributable to everybody who ever goes to the shop or uses anything.

The fact is that while a lot can be achieved remotely it is not the stuff that keeps people alive,  when it comes down to brass tacks, healing the sick, feeding people and generally making peoples lives liveable all require somebody to do something on site. Nobody ever unblocked a toilet via the internet, grew wheat, fed cows,  and actually got products into shops or homes remotely. What really gets done remotely is largely the ever increasing administration and collection of revenue from services provided on the ground.

Of course I meant subsidise fuel costs for commercial vehicles via taxation (and possibly excessive profits). It is something that everybody benefits from not just the users of the vehicles. It's exactly because the costs have to be passed on to the customers that they should be subsidised.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Vince said:

That only applies if you never do any of the other stuff that everybody else does with vehicles. In one return flight you have already generated the same as the average car user in a year, then if you use a car for even half the usual mileage you are a higher contributor.

I don't need to justify myself to you and Dashcam, but I do 1,500-2,000 miles a year in a car because I mostly cycle locally. I've never claimed to have a low carbon footprint, but it's still less than Dashcam's (and quite possibly yours as well) despite travelling well outside of my county boundaries.  

Quote

The fact is that while a lot can be achieved remotely it is not the stuff that keeps people alive,  when it comes down to brass tacks, healing the sick, feeding people and generally making peoples lives liveable all require somebody to do something on site. Nobody ever unblocked a toilet via the internet, grew wheat, fed cows,  and actually got products into shops or homes remotely. What really gets done remotely is largely the ever increasing administration and collection of revenue from services provided on the ground.

Ah yes, I forgot that anyone pursuing what you'd describe as an academic occupation is not doing a real job in your book. You are of course clearly quite happy to use the Internet, but I'd guess that just appeared and is run by magic. :rolleyes:

No-one has claimed all jobs can be done remotely, but a great number of them can be done partially or fully as the last couple of years has demonstrated. And my original point was also not that people don't have to go into work, but they should consider living closer to their workplaces. 

Edited by Humphrey Appleby
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5 hours ago, DC2 said:

 

I don’t know if that’s the truth but I would like to see it as the lead story on BBC News today with a rational rebuttal from the UKHSA if appropriate.

Only the mainstream narrative ever gets heard in headline news!

:rofl: 

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9 hours ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

I don't need to justify myself to you and Dashcam, but I do 1,500-2,000 miles a year in a car because I mostly cycle locally. I've never claimed to have a low carbon footprint, but it's still less than Dashcam's (and quite possibly yours as well) despite travelling well outside of my county boundaries.  

Ah yes, I forgot that anyone pursuing what you'd describe as an academic occupation is not doing a real job in your book. You are of course clearly quite happy to use the Internet, but I'd guess that just appeared and is run by magic. :rolleyes:

No-one has claimed all jobs can be done remotely, but a great number of them can be done partially or fully as the last couple of years has demonstrated. 

You were telling us how to save fuel and emissions, I just pointed out that it wasn't as clear cut as you were saying. You have absolutely no clue what my carbon footprint is. If you are including our working hours then you are being very hypocritical. If you are going to include the total emissions of commercial vehicles then you have to include the total emissions of the aircraft you travel on.

Yet again you attribute comments to me that I haven't made. I do believe that there is a large and growing over emphasis on academia against practical skills. That is very different to saying that no academics are doing a real job. The internet doesn't appear by magic but neither does enough food and one of those you can manage without in an emergency.

As for working from home then yes there are certain important jobs that can be done remotely but for every research scientist working from home I will raise you 100 call centre workers selling something or other. The fact still remains that the jobs that are truly crucial to our everyday lives, food and fuel production and delivery, along with sanitation mostly can't be done remotely.

10 hours ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

And my original point was also not that people don't have to go into work, but they should consider living closer to their workplaces. 

When we have just established you literally live the opposite side of the world to your job at times!

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