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Sidney the robin

Briggs, Fundin, Mauger , Crump, Rickardsson, Roll of honour.

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6 hours ago, norbold said:

1933: 9.79; 1934: 10.26; 1935: 8.74; 1936: 9.95; 1937: 10.73; 1938: 8.13; 1939: 10.44; 1946: 11.57

Those are Langton's home averages only.

Great figures strange how when his average had dipped the following year he often put a point or 1.5 on his figure again.Langton and the New Zealander Ron Johnson are two great riders who often get forgotten.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, BOBBATH said:

Last time I was in London, it looked like Sportspages had closed down, was it a victim of the internet and wikipaedia do you think? Has it ever reopened?

Sportspages closed its doors in London about 15 years ago. The one in Manchester, I believe closed following the Arndale bomb. 

Pretty sure the shop owner John Gaustad passed away a couple of years ago.

I spent many an hour browsing away in the shop in London. 

Edit. Just checked my copy of "Speedway in London", which was purchased from Sportspages, and indeed it is autographed by Mark Loram.

Edited by salty
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8 hours ago, norbold said:

1933: 9.79; 1934: 10.26; 1935: 8.74; 1936: 9.95; 1937: 10.73; 1938: 8.13; 1939: 10.44; 1946: 11.57

Those are Langton's home averages only.

In 1933 the heat point scoring was 4-2-1-0 (as it was in 1929).  Do you know if the 1933 average figure above is an actual based on 4-2-1-0 or has it been 'corrected' to a 3-2-1-0 system (hope that makes sense) ?

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, compost said:

In 1933 the heat point scoring was 4-2-1-0 (as it was in 1929).  Do you know if the 1933 average figure above is an actual based on 4-2-1-0 or has it been 'corrected' to a 3-2-1-0 system (hope that makes sense) ?

Yes, sorry, I meant to say, but it was getting late! It has been converted to 3-2-1.

Edited by norbold

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3 hours ago, Sidney the robin said:

Great figures strange how when his average had dipped the following year he often put a point or 1.5 on his figure again.Langton and the New Zealander Ron Johnson are two great riders who often get forgotten.

Here are details of Ron Johnston's World Final appearances. Impressive!

 

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Just for completeness, here are the rest of the top averages in Peter Jackson's post-War stats:

  • 1946: Eric Langton 11.13
  • 1947: Vic Duggan 11.75
  • 1948: Vic Duggan 11.47
  • 1949: Vic Duggan 10.65
  • 1950: Graham Warren 10.45
  • 1951: Aub Lawson 10.31
  • 1952: Ronnie Moore 11.36
  • 1953: Jack Young 10.61
  • 1954: Ronnie Moore 10.59
  • 1955: Ronnie Moore 10.86
  • 1956: Barry Briggs 10.53
  • 1957: Peter Craven 11.14

 

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15 hours ago, chunky said:

Actually, they are not interchangeable, Bob. People have always done that, but it's just more prevalent now. It's based on how people interpret words when they hear the contractions "would've", "could've", and "should've". They interpret it as "could OF" etc.

Think about the usage, based on questions and answers:

Q - Have you done what I asked?

A - Sorry, I should have (should've).

It's a direct response. The question "OF you done what I asked" doesn't make any sense.

It's the same these days with people not understanding the difference between "then" and "than"; the two have totally different meanings, and are not interchangeable.

Referring to the second part of your comment, there were lots of words not in common usage when you left the UK, that are now! "Bottle" is one that still means nothing to North Americans, as a "bottle job" to them means you've coloured your hair!

Hi chunky, thanks for taking the trouble to answer this, good explanation that helped my understanding.

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13 hours ago, norbold said:

Re- of and have, I agree with chunky. I know languages evolve over time, but the use of of instead of have is just plain wrong.

As far as the use of the word bottle goes, it has been in common usage at least in the East End for as long as I can remember. Back in the 1960s, when a rider was behind in a race and packed up, we often used to write in the programme "bottle gone" instead of e/f or d.n.f.

Also thank you for your answer too Norbold.

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14 hours ago, norbold said:

Re- of and have, I agree with chunky. I know languages evolve over time, but the use of of instead of have is just plain wrong.

As far as the use of the word bottle goes, it has been in common usage at least in the East End for as long as I can remember. Back in the 1960s, when a rider was behind in a race and packed up, we often used to write in the programme "bottle gone" instead of e/f or d.n.f.

In German the word Flasche meaning bottle is also slang for an idiot.

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7 hours ago, salty said:

Sportspages closed its doors in London about 15 years ago. The one in Manchester, I believe closed following the Arndale bomb. 

Pretty sure the shop owner John Gaustad passed away a couple of years ago.

I spent many an hour browsing away in the shop in London. 

Edit. Just checked my copy of "Speedway in London", which was purchased from Sportspages, and indeed it is autographed by Mark Loram.

Used to be a regular in the shop. Didn't work that far away at one time. The one book I sort of regret never buying, was  a history of Stamford Bridge. Of course mostly about Chelsea football, but did have a section on the speedway. I just couldn't bring myself to buy what was mainly a Chelsea book

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On ‎10‎/‎7‎/‎2020 at 2:29 PM, BL65 said:

1929: Jack Parker (Coventry - Southern League) 10.76, Arthur Jervis (Manchester White City - Northern League) 10.00.
1930: Ginger Lees (Liverpool - Northern) 10.89, Vic Huxley (Harringay - Southern) 10.55. (Jack Parker, Coventry, 10.34).
1931: Eric Langton (Belle Vue - Northern) 11.28, Dick Case (Wimbledon - Southern) 10.14. (Jack Parker, Southampton, 10.02).
1932: Dick Case (Wimbledon - National League) 10.42. (Jack Parker, Clapton, 8.80 - Southampton team moved to Clapton).

Guess you can take what you want out of these figures, but one thing at least, the top man from 1930 in the North, Ginger Lees, basically missed the 1929 season, as he was riding in Hamburg and sometimes Copenhagen. Think he basically beat all comers including Jervis. The only rider to really get the better of him was Sprouts Elder

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2 hours ago, iris123 said:

Guess you can take what you want out of these figures, but one thing at least, the top man from 1930 in the North, Ginger Lees, basically missed the 1929 season, as he was riding in Hamburg and sometimes Copenhagen. Think he basically beat all comers including Jervis. The only rider to really get the better of him was Sprouts Elder

Ginger Lees rode for Burnley in 1929, but they packed up in June, after (I think) only five meetings. With no English track, he took himself off to ride, as you say, in Germany and Denmark.

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2 hours ago, norbold said:

Ginger Lees rode for Burnley in 1929, but they packed up in June, after (I think) only five meetings. With no English track, he took himself off to ride, as you say, in Germany and Denmark.

As you say, Burnley only rode in five league matches. The last meeting at Burnley was an open meeting on July 7. The track closed down for good after that.

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Rickardsson certainly the best ive seen in my era (1999-2020). Superb. 
 

Nicki P , Crump, Woffy and Hancock would complete my top 5 . Before anyone starts, thats my era. Not counting anyone before hand. 

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On 10/6/2020 at 10:49 PM, Terry said:

Exactly. I consider Barry Thomas to be the greatest rider ever :D

Tony Rickardsson would be number 1 for me for two reasons. He was a whisker away from winning 5 consecutive world titles, (ok technically he finished 3rd in 2000, but does anybody honestly believe that he wouldn't have won the final if Mark Loram hadn't got the second place he needed in the consolation final?)

Secondly for his astonishing performance in the 2005 series. 6 wins, one 2nd and a 3rd from 9 rounds.

In league racing however, it's got to be Hans Nielsen. He was just a points machine!

Absolutely.  I remember that final GP in 2000 vividly, and Rickardsson was absolutely superb.  He was never headed before the final and I've no doubt he'd have won that final if he'd needed to - he was simply deflated after Loram had sealed the total.  It was a terrific achievement from Loram to win a title during a period when Rickardsson was at his absolute peak

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