Jump to content
British Speedway Forum
Sign in to follow this  
steve roberts

The Olympic Games

Recommended Posts

10 minutes ago, chunky said:

I'm still gobsmacked by what happened to us in the coxless fours...

I remember when Princess Anne kissed the cox of the Oxford crew:o:blink::rofl:

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/26/2021 at 9:53 PM, falcace said:

It's the most notable omission and the only reason I can come up with is that racquetball is the preferred game in the US. Those American sponsors have a fair old sway on the Olympic programme. Squash will mean very little to the priority markets. Personally, I love the Olympics. Though I accept there are some anomalies. 

If it were down to me...well, firstly what  great job that would be...I'd only include sports where Olympic gold is the absolute pinnacle in that sport and it also requires some athleticism. So, golf, football, tennis, baseball can all go and take shooting and archery with them. Oh and the race walking too, that can go.....just because it's a silly sport. 

Damn it. There goes my proposal for nude ludo ................

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/26/2021 at 4:28 PM, norbold said:

Agree. Especially as they won't allow squash in. What's the rationale for that?

Squash is put forward by their Federation every 4 years and never makes it in the Olympic sports. It usually makes it to the last stages and one time it lost out the final section to Wrestling I think. The irony is the retired President Head of the Olympic Committee was a decent player, and we thought that that would clinch it for us to get the final say. A nationwide day of Squash was organised in 2010 and practically ever club in this country took part. Each court was occupied by players playing during a 24 hour period and it did give the sport a lot of publicity but to no avail.  We all had 2010 teeshirts on and posed for publicity pictures for the local press and National magazines. The sport is played in every continent and everyone can play Squash as it's not an 'elitist  sport' like some other sports. The Olympics is the poorer for the exclusion of Squash as it has all the ethics of the original Olympic movement.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post

I'm looking forward to the end of Blu's extensive training preparation for the forthcoming Olympic heats of the synchronised tweeting marathon. I think he and the lone wolf have a good chance of taking a medal . Not to mention the fact that their reserve/substitute at eighty five, is the oldest competitor at this years games    :) 

 

  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post

Why having had the Olympics fully televised the entire day on BBC1 and then further coverage from 7-30pm I have to endure 15 minutes of Olympic news on the 6-00pm News following immediately after the day's coverage?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
5 hours ago, jrs said:

I'm looking forward to the end of Blu's extensive training preparation for the forthcoming Olympic heats of the synchronised tweeting marathon. I think he and the lone wolf have a good chance of taking a medal . Not to mention the fact that their reserve/substitute at eighty five, is the oldest competitor at this years games    :) 

 

Sort of brings back memories of the Wiesbock brothers in speedway or the long distance runners who swapped places

But I am not sure there has been a case of someone who changes places with himself, just by putting a wig on and pretending to be a nurse :D

  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, iris123 said:

Sort of brings back memories of the Wiesbock brothers in speedway or the long distance runners who swapped places

But I am not sure there has been a case of someone who changes places with himself, just by putting a wig on and pretending to be a nurse :D

Recall there was some confusion with the Gordeev Brothers for a while when Vladimir was placed on a 12 month ban and brother Valeri emerged?

Edited by steve roberts

Share this post


Link to post
2 hours ago, steve roberts said:

Recall there was some confusion with the Gordeev Brothers for a while when Vladimir was placed on a 12 month ban and brother Valeri emerged?

In all honesty, the first I heard about that was on here about a year or so ago

Share this post


Link to post
6 minutes ago, iris123 said:

In all honesty, the first I heard about that was on here about a year or so ago

I forget the background but there was some stories circulating in the west regarding the emerging younger brother who was unknown outside the east at the time. Perhaps someone could clarify as I'm sure I didn't imagine it?

Share this post


Link to post
21 hours ago, Tsunami said:

Squash is put forward by their Federation every 4 years and never makes it in the Olympic sports. It usually makes it to the last stages and one time it lost out the final section to Wrestling I think. The irony is the retired President Head of the Olympic Committee was a decent player, and we thought that that would clinch it for us to get the final say. A nationwide day of Squash was organised in 2010 and practically ever club in this country took part. Each court was occupied by players playing during a 24 hour period and it did give the sport a lot of publicity but to no avail.  We all had 2010 teeshirts on and posed for publicity pictures for the local press and National magazines. The sport is played in every continent and everyone can play Squash as it's not an 'elitist  sport' like some other sports. The Olympics is the poorer for the exclusion of Squash as it has all the ethics of the original Olympic movement.

It is galling for them, particularly when their "cousins" table tennis, badminton and "big cousin" tennis all have an invite to the party. I know karate was also long banging on the door, but it's governance internationally is a mess. But they still got in. Ironic that squash got the chop again.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

Interesting discussion on BBC Breakfast about the lack of medals for the rowing team, despite £27m of public investment. The thrust of it being...how can we get back to winning rowing medals again?

In my opinion, the focus is all wrong. We have become an Olympic powerhouse, lavishing money on world class facilities and elite training programmes to effectively buy medals in sports like rowing, sailing and track cycling. Meanwhile, grassroots sport struggles on, playing fields are lost and the nation gets more inactive and more obese. I agree that there is an inspiration factor in developing role models who succeed at the Olympics, but if it doesn't translate into grass roots participation, then what's the return on that investment?  Nice for the athlete, the team and the Governing Body, but apart from the fleeting thrill the country might get from a rowing or sailing gold, there's little tangible impact.

Let's not be asking how we get more rowing medals. Let's be asking how we better spend millions across sport to create a more active and healthy nation.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, falcace said:

In my opinion, the focus is all wrong. We have become an Olympic powerhouse, lavishing money on world class facilities and elite training programmes to effectively buy medals in sports like rowing, sailing and track cycling. Meanwhile, grassroots sport struggles on, playing fields are lost and the nation gets more inactive and more obese. I agree that there is an inspiration factor in developing role models who succeed at the Olympics, but if it doesn't translate into grass roots participation, then what's the return on that investment?  Nice for the athlete, the team and the Governing Body, but apart from the fleeting thrill the country might get from a rowing or sailing gold, there's little tangible impact.

Let's not be asking how we get more rowing medals. Let's be asking how we better spend millions across sport to create a more active and healthy nation.

I actually find the medal jingoism to be pretty appalling, with anyone failing to 'medal' being viewed as a failure and will often have their funding cut, when in fact even getting into the Olympics is a fantastic achievement. There is also a degree of throwing money at sports with multiple medal chances (e.g. cycling and rowing) to inflate the apparent level of success.

Most of us want our teams to be successful, and I certainly remember the dark days of the 1980s and 1990s when we were rubbish at pretty much every sport. However, the obsession with funding elite sport and the notion that spending has to lead to top-level success, seems to have permeated through every level of every sport in England.

Yet the UK still has some of the worst grassroots facilities (certainly for major sports) of any developed country. You only have to look at the fantastic facilities (often public) in places like the Australia, the Netherlands, and the US that even the lowest teams have access to, yet in the UK teams are often playing in dilapidated council parks with rundown and vandalised changing rooms. It's an absolute disgrace when so much money is being thrown at sports that have minuscule levels of participation by comparison.

The reality is that the vast majority of those involved in sport can never hope to compete at a high level and are simply doing it for fun. But the health, community and social cohesion benefits can be immense. 

I do agree that you perhaps need some champions to inspire the next generation, but equally most sports in Olympic are by their nature pretty 'elite' and inaccessible to anyone without the time or money to pursue them. The average person doesn't live anywhere near a velodrome, rowing lake, or in many cases even near a 50 metre pool, and they will never be substitute for traditional community sports.

Edited by Humphrey Appleby
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
33 minutes ago, Humphrey Appleby said:

I actually find the medal jingoism to be pretty appalling, with anyone failing to 'medal' being viewed as a failure and will often have their funding cut, when in fact even getting into the Olympics is a fantastic achievement. There is also a degree of throwing money at sports with multiple medal chances (e.g. cycling and rowing) to inflate the apparent level of success.

Most of us want our teams to be successful, and I certainly remember the dark days of the 1980s and 1990s when we were rubbish at pretty much every sport. However, the obsession with funding elite sport and the notion that spending has to lead to top-level success, seems to have permeated through every level of every sport in England.

Yet the UK still has some of the worst grassroots facilities (certainly for major sports) of any developed country. You only have to look at the fantastic facilities (often public) in places like the Australia, the Netherlands, and the US that even the lowest teams have access to, yet in the UK teams are often playing in dilapidated council parks with rundown and vandalised changing rooms. It's an absolute disgrace when so much money is being thrown at sports that have minuscule levels of participation by comparison.

The reality is that the vast majority of those involved in sport can never hope to compete at a high level and are simply doing it for fun. But the health, community and social cohesion benefits can be immense. 

I do agree that you perhaps need some champions to inspire the next generation, but equally most sports in Olympic are by their nature pretty 'elite' and inaccessible to anyone without the time or money to pursue them. The average person doesn't live anywhere near a velodrome, rowing lake, or in many cases even near a 50 metre pool, and they will never be substitute for traditional community sports.

At the risk of drifting into management speak...there is no "joined-up" thinking. UK Sport have become a medal factory without any thought of the legacy...there is a real disconnect between elite sport and the grassroots. Sport is such a force for good, but it needs a wholesale rethink in the UK.

We were absolutely rubbish at the 1996 Olympics with just one gold....and that prompted the massive lottery funding to elite sport to ensure it didn't happen again. Yet, as a nation we were fitter and healthier then. We have drifted too far in the opposite direction. 

I was actually in the US when those Olympics were on, working in the kitchen for the summer at Camp America in a Minnesota backwater. Picture the scene, every morning started with a roll call in the dining hall of all the American gold medals to a packed room of brats chanting "USA, USA, USA" :o. Equally, I took a trip to the local University in Bemidji (small place really), the facilities on campus were mind blowing....Ice Hockey stadium, Indoor 400m track with 4 basketball courts inside, American football stadium...all open to the community in a complete backwater town.

I don't know what the formula would be, but my suggestion would be a funding model that gives resources to the sports that can prove they are inspiring participation at the grass roots. I'm not sure what significant difference - if any - another kayak sprint medal or equestrian medal makes to the nation's health. I'd rather we had a properly funded GB basketball team to provide a visible pathway and aspiration for inner city kids....of which 0.9m kids play every week.

Edited by falcace
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Posted (edited)
28 minutes ago, falcace said:

At the risk of drifting into management speak...there is no "joined-up" thinking. UK Sport have become a medal factory without any thought of the legacy...there is a real disconnect between elite sport and the grassroots. Sport is such a force for good, but it needs a wholesale rethink in the UK.

We were absolutely rubbish at the 1996 Olympics with just one gold....and that prompted the massive lottery funding to elite sport to ensure it didn't happen again. Yet, as a nation we were fitter and healthier then. We have drifted too far in the opposite direction. 

I was actually in the US when those Olympics were on, working in the kitchen for the summer at Camp America in a Minnesota backwater. Picture the scene, every morning started with a roll call in the dining hall of all the American gold medals to a packed room of brats chanting "USA, USA, USA" :o. Equally, I took a trip to the local University in Bemidji (small place really), the facilities on campus were mind blowing....Ice Hockey stadium, Indoor 400m track with 4 basketball courts inside, American football stadium...all open to the community in a complete backwater town.

I don't know what the formula would be, but my suggestion would be a funding model that gives resources to the sports that can prove they are inspiring participation at the grass roots. I'm not sure what significant difference - if any - another kayak sprint medal or equestrian medal makes to the nation's health. I'd rather we had a properly funded GB basketball team to provide a visible pathway and aspiration for inner city kids....of which 0.9m kids play every week.

The above makes it all the more admirable that Bethany Shriever, who after BMX lost their Olympic funding from UKSport had to raise £50K funding herself for her Olympic training and today had the pleasure of bringing home a gold medal.  A brilliant performance.  I assume that Kye White who won silver in the men's BMX final was also deprived of funding. It was a pleasure to see their obvious joy and emotions after their races. 

Maybe in hindsight UKSport may belatedly restore their funding .

Edited by jrs
Predictive text
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
5 minutes ago, jrs said:

The above makes it all the more admirable that Bethany Shriever, who after BMX lost their Olympic funding from UKSport had to raise £50K funding herself for her Olympic training and today had the pleasure of bringing home a gold medal.  A brilliant performance.  I assume that Kye White who won silver in the men's BMX final was also deprived of funding. It was a pleasure to see their obvious joy and emotions after their races. 

Maybe in hindsight UKSport may belatedly restore their funding .

Superb performance. And - you would think - its much more worthy of funding a sport like BMX which is way more accessible to more kids than sailing or equestrian.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Privacy Policy