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topaz325

Birds in decline

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As discussed in Winter watch last , a study of European bird numbers since 1980 has seen a loss of 900 million birds, these are mostly birds that live on farm land and Heath land.:cry:

Also mention the bird flu infection that is killing domestic and large amounts of wild birds ...........the infection thought to have come from the far East.

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Don't let Blu see this, as he will blame wind turbines -_-

Sadly reports of barnacle geese among other wild birds/geese dying around Hamburg over the past couple of weeks. I saw one or two along the river last year. Plus the blackbird popualtion was fairly devestated a couple of years back with a virus, but now seems to be recovering somewhat

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1 hour ago, iris123 said:

Don't let Blu see this, as he will blame wind turbines -_-

Sadly reports of barnacle geese among other wild birds/geese dying around Hamburg over the past couple of weeks. I saw one or two along the river last year. Plus the blackbird popualtion was fairly devestated a couple of years back with a virus, but now seems to be recovering somewhat

Barnacle geese down by nearly 50% of the wintering flock on the Solway Firth due to bird flu.

Edited by topaz325
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Ask Frank McAvennie. He knows where the birds are.

Joking aside, my garden is full of them at this time of year. Have to top up the feeders nearly twice a day. Healthy appetities on them.

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5 minutes ago, topsoil said:

Ask Frank McAvennie. He knows where the birds are.

Joking aside, my garden is full of them at this time of year. Have to top up the feeders nearly twice a day. Healthy appetities on them.

The thing is to keep the feeders clean, though i am guilty of leaving them for weeks without cleaning the feeders. 

The procedure is to clean thoroughly on a weekly basis.:oops:

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It's really weird here in Ohio too. There was a mystery virus during the summer which was affecting the birds, and we were advised to take down all our feeders. I put them back up a couple of months ago, as this is usually the busy time, but it's pretty dead. I started with the suet feeders, and then the seed ones. The suet is very slow, and one of the seed feeders has had about an inch taken out, while the other one hasn't been touched.

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3 minutes ago, topaz325 said:

The thing is to keep the feeders clean, though i am guilty of leaving them for weeks without cleaning the feeders. 

The procedure is to clean thoroughly on a weekly basis.:oops:

Usually here, the feeders are emptied in a few days, so it's not an issue...

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Is it possible that the decline of the smaller birds is more down to the increase in larger birds. 

Just by eye the Crow, Gull, Pigeon population has increased massively over the last decade & also growing at a seemingly greater rate are Buzzards & Red Kite down to breading by Keeper's. 

Just wish the Owl population would pick back up again, my favourite bird

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9 minutes ago, Daniel Smith said:

Is it possible that the decline of the smaller birds is more down to the increase in larger birds. 

Just by eye the Crow, Gull, Pigeon population has increased massively over the last decade & also growing at a seemingly greater rate are Buzzards & Red Kite down to breading by Keeper's. 

Just wish the Owl population would pick back up again, my favourite bird

We had a Cooper's Hawk take down a red-bellied woodpecker from the suet feeder a couple of weeks ago!

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18 minutes ago, Daniel Smith said:

Is it possible that the decline of the smaller birds is more down to the increase in larger birds. 

Just by eye the Crow, Gull, Pigeon population has increased massively over the last decade & also growing at a seemingly greater rate are Buzzards & Red Kite down to breading by Keeper's. 

Just wish the Owl population would pick back up again, my favourite bird

Because Red Kites are mainly scavengers, they visit the maggot farm regularly looking for an easy meal, and especially when the chicken lorry comes back to base with a load. They are very impressive creatures...

Edited by Blupanther

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I do think the big bird population has increased greatly. But it is the geese mostly here. Major problem for the farmers who are complaining their crops are being devastated by greylags etc

Plus others in cities are complains of aggressive and dirty Canada or Egyptian geese populations. I know locally we often get a couple of Canada geese here for a few weeks and the mess on the pavement is quite a thing to see after a few days :D

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6 hours ago, topaz325 said:

As discussed in Winter watch last , a study of European bird numbers since 1980 has seen a loss of 900 million birds, these are mostly birds that live on farm land and Heath land.:cry:

Also mention the bird flu infection that is killing domestic and large amounts of wild birds ...........the infection thought to have come from the far East.

Yes it made for disturbing viewing watching Winter Watch and the figures being mentioned...having moved house and now having a garden I'm going to try my hardest in encouraging both birds and insects to visit.

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17 hours ago, Daniel Smith said:

Is it possible that the decline of the smaller birds is more down to the increase in larger birds. 

Just by eye the Crow, Gull, Pigeon population has increased massively over the last decade & also growing at a seemingly greater rate are Buzzards & Red Kite down to breading by Keeper's. 

Just wish the Owl population would pick back up again, my favourite bird

I have noticed an increase in Buzzards and Covids over the years but the massive decline in the smaller species ie sparrows , finches and larks appears to be intensive farming techniques, and the use of pesticides.

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16 minutes ago, topaz325 said:

I have noticed an increase in Buzzards and Covids over the years but the massive decline in the smaller species ie sparrows , finches and larks appears to be intensive farming techniques, and the use of pesticides.

Yes larks, lapwings etc have had a massive decline. Insect eaters and ground breeders hedgerow breeders. Those birds that can adapt to living in urban areas I think have done better than those that are dependent on agricultural land. But also those that breed in old buildings have suffered with new building techniques that give them little access 

One surprising area in Hamburg where they still breed ( lapwing and lark)is the airport. Also seems to be a Fox family that live and breed there. Although very loud it is protected from people and their dogs for instance

On the big bird theme we have had an exploding population of Nandu’s here that are also causing problems with the farmers and also a traffic problem . Eggs have been destroyed and birds allowed to be culled to keep the population down 

But we are generally having problems between those for and against wolves, beavers and the lynx ….

Edited by iris123

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8 hours ago, topaz325 said:

I have noticed an increase in Buzzards and Covids over the years but the massive decline in the smaller species ie sparrows , finches and larks appears to be intensive farming techniques, and the use of pesticides.

Remember visiting Camarthen in Wales in 1997 and being amazed to see a pair of buzzards sitting on fence posts near where we were staying, now I can see two or three soaring above the wood to the rear of our house almost every day! Believe that the demise of smaller garden birds is partly down to domestic cats as well. 

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