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Gary Guglielmi interview in Backtrack issue 94

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1 hour ago, Gambo said:

Got my copy in the post today.

Ta, hopefully get mine in the next couple of days then....

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How many track shops still sell the magazine. I know it was available this season at Eastbourne.

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I signed up for a subscription last Tuesday but haven't received issue 94 yet, anyone still waiting for there copy

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I subscribe and got my latest edition of Backtrack last week.

 

Just read the Gary Gugliemi interview. Fascinating stuff cause while many people who followed speedway at that time knew about the drugs and Billy Sanders stuff, I'm not sure if Garys ever been interviewed about the story giving a more in depth look at things?

 

Sounds crazy that he'd try to smuggle drugs in his engine and that the motorcycle authority repercussions in the aftermath were draconinan.

 

I've never spoke to Gary Gugliemi but at the time my opinions of him were something of a wild, harum scareum racer who probably was the same of the track and not the most pleasant of people. The interview completely blows this personality analysis apart cause the guy sounds like a lovely thoughtful person who was probably naïve in his youth like we all are. A similar scenario I think exists with Michael Lee whereby people who've never met him will look at his life story and think he must be some really awful person.

Like always Backtracks a great read!  

Edited by 25yearfan
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It's a brilliant interview, one of the best I've read in Backtrack. It certainly gives things a lot more perspective and allows Gary to tell his side of the story.

I always thought he was a little bit of a hot head, and his riding was 'forceful' to say the least, but the interview is very thoughtful and reflective.

I don't think that there's any doubt that he was held as a bit of a scapegoat for the drug problems of the era as he wasn't as 'box office' as the Americans or Michael Lee.

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Very true Garry.

 

I suspect there would of been a major rider shortage at the time if all riders taking recreational drugs were banned from riding!

 

Feel sorry for Steve Payne if what Guglielmi says is true. 

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Have to agree that it is a fascinating interview. GG was one of my favourite opposing riders of the early 80's, big and forceful on a bike, who was on the verge of international success when he made his mistake. Like others I feel the punishment by the Speedway authorities was draconian, but glad to see he's happy in life.

Well done to Backtrack and all involved in getting the interview in print. With 90 plus issues under their belt there are less fresh interviewees to cover, but  this one and the fairly recent Tony Lomas article have been top quality.

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On ‎10‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 4:56 PM, Gambo said:

Got my copy in the post today.

Many thanks, Dave, for helping to make the interview with GG possible.

As you know, we have been hoping to talk with him for some years and in the end, thanks largely to your 35-plus years relationship with him and the trust he showed in you and us, we finally got there.

A big thanks to GG, too, for his professionalism and co-operation throughout the prices - answering many awkward questions with as much honesty as could reasonably be expected, responding quickly to emails and texts (working around the Oz-UK time difference) and helping with personal photos from the family archives.

I first met Gary when he was riding for Boston at Crayford in 1979 and, as usual, I was there for Speedway Mail. We chatted and he came across like a typically engaging, very friendly young Aussie. I liked him from that night and I respect and like him even more now that I've heard his story, first-hand, and know the full extent of what he and his family have been through.

He still feels bad about what happened to Steve Payne, because - as GG says in the interview - the drug smuggling fiasco was entirely of his making.

 

Edited by tmc
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